16 August 2011

Mediterranean Garden Society

Whether or not you live in a Mediterranean gardening zone, chances are that you already grow or are interested in growing typical plants of the area.

Oregon State University (here)
"You don't need to be Spanish, Italian or Greek to enjoy the beauty of Mediterranean gardening. Other parts of the world that also have mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers can take lessons from the many lovely gardens in this Old World region and its centuries, even millennia, of experience with these conditions. These gardens use plants that are able to store the moisture they need in the winter and survive – even thrive – through the summer without irrigation."

"Mediterranean gardening is different from xeriscaping, although they are both waterwise approaches. Xeriscaping is best suited for desert climates with only a few inches of total precipitation for the year. By contrast, Mediterranean gardens require wet winters when plants can store up moisture to see them through the summer. What Mediterranean gardening and xeriscaping have in common is to reduce or eliminate artificial watering once plants are established."


There is a brand new online conversation for those interested
Mediterranean Garden Society Forum Check it out here.

The topics under perennials include: Salvia, Oenethera, Dianthus
Salvia Elegans or Pineapple Sage from Plant of the Week


And, if you are in the mood to look at suppliers for these plants, here's a link to that conversation.
Plant suppliers. includes U.S., U.K., France, Italy, etc.

Want to explore a little more? Here's a blog from the U.K. called My Climate Change Garden in which the author talks about the hot weather zone plants doing well in England.

2 comments:

buy salvia divinorum said...

Hello, Really nice Blog awesome keep it up dude,i would like to say that about the blog its very nice and useful thanks for sharing nice blogging.

Castlerock Xeriscape said...

Thanks for the information, I thought it was totally similar with xeriscaping.