20 March 2017

The Foodscape Revolution: Finding a Better Way to Make Space for Food and Beauty in Your Garden

Most of us experienced gardeners grow herbs and vegetables and and some fruits in our flower and perennial beds and now it's become a movement.

I've tucked cucumbers on the fence behind the perennials, grown cantaloupe vines and grapes on chain link fences among shrubs and flowering trees, grown pawpaws in the daylily bed, etc.

A new book "The Foodscape Revolution: Finding a Better Way to Make Space for Food and Beauty in Your Garden" by Brie Arthur tells us more about how to succeed and introduces new gardeners to the idea of mixing things up.

If you enjoy videos, here's a link to her 25 minute podcast https://briegrows.com/2016/10/
"Getting Dirty in Your Garden", brought to you by North Carolina State Extension Master Gardener Volunteers.

Arthur's How-to:  •Use the existing landscape • Utilize a an ornamental base • Work with HOA Guidelines • Think Outside of the Box • Select plants to create an engaging space • Full sun • High traffic area • Grow on YOUR terms… gardening is a wonderful hobby

Why Foodscape: • Organic and sustainable land management • Increases bio-diversity • Improves soil health • Abundance of beneficial insects • Create a living ecosystem in every landscape • Reduces disease issues • Conversation Starter • Easily irrigated and managed

The book is broken into parts Part One is the anatomy and framework, what to plant, care and maintenance. Part Two is foodscape project ideas including a property screen meadow, an edible neighborhood entry, patio pots and alternative ideas. Part Three is harvest, preserve the harvest and recipes.

Appendices include plant listings, resources and end pieces.

The ideas in this book are ingenious and the photography is mouth watering. Arthur breaks your yard into zones with zone one being closest to the house and water source. (We grow our thornless blackberries on a back fence which is definitely zone 3 for us but they rarely need water.)

Zone one is your house foundation or containers close in where care is easiest. Here's where you'd grow cucumbers, lettuce and water thirsty veggies.

Arthur discusses ornamentals for your foodscape both for color and to attract pollinators. Plus she talks about woody perennials such as trees and shrubs.

For beautiful edibles, Arthur suggests corn, oats, rice, sorghum, wheat, basil, chard, beans, peppers, eggplant, broccoli, etc.

There are chapters on problems and potential problems though as gardeners know those vary by region.

If you need any encouragement at all to grow fruit and vegetables and herbs all over your garden and yard, you'll love this book! Great for class rooms, children and community gardens, families and community front yard revolutions.

The book is a 192 page hard cover, 8 by 7-inches. Published by St. Lynn's Press.
Prices range from $15 to $22.


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